About Dr. Meiland Ph.D: Philosophy, Approaches to Therapy & Testing

Clinical Psychologist Manhattan, NYC

Peter Meiland Ph.D

Peter Meiland Ph.D

New York City Based Clinical Psychologist

My experience in psychotherapy and testing with a wide range of clients began in 1998, when I entered graduate school in Clinical Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. I earned my doctorate (Ph.D.) there in 1995, and trained as a psychoanalyst between 2002 and 2008 in order to deepen my skills and understanding in helping my clients.

I have been in private practice in the Union Square neighborhood since 1996, and have also worked in a number of clinical and educational settings. For ten years, I taught in the Psychology Department at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, C.U.N.Y, and for four of those years, taught at New York University in their Continuing Education program. Between 1998 and 2002, I worked as a staff psychologist at the Learning Disabilities Unit of the S.U.N.Y. College of Optometry, a multi-disciplinary environment where I developed an expertise in diagnosing learning disabilities and developmental delays, mostly with children in grade school.

Philosophy and Approaches to Clinical Psychology and Therapy:

My approach to doing therapy is different for each person I see, so it’s hard to describe myself in simple terms. While my training and background is broadly psychoanalytic, I am interactive with my clients, and don’t fit the mold of the silent analyst. I am supportive, direct in my ways of talking about problems, and have a good sense of humor. It is not hard to know who I am when you meet with me.

One strong assumption for me is that people are the “experts” in their own lives. This may not be how they feel in the first meeting, but the process of therapy should help people find strength in themselves and make courageous choices and take risks in their lives. While being cared for by others is important, it’s also necessary to take care of yourself, even to put your own needs first at times, although that may feel “selfish” or make you feel guilty in some ways. My role is to help a person understand themselves more deeply, exploring their lives in a way that can only happen in the safety of therapy. People ask me for advice, and I’m happy to encourage people not to make choices that are harmful to them, or to confront the images people have of themselves that make them feel helpless or powerless. In my experience, when people ask me what they should do in a dilemma, they already know the answer, but need help in following their own advice.

Approaches to Psychological and Psychoeducational Testing:

Testing is a specialized niche for psychologists and educators, and one of the challenges in testing for learning disabilities is to isolate areas of difficulty, and point out the ways in which people compensate for areas of difficulty, by becoming experts in some other dimension of academic life. For example, a person who struggles to read fluently is likely to be a person with a very strong memory for what he/she hears in the classroom. A person who works inefficiently is likely to be very resilient and hardworking, and to not give when they struggle. While a student with a learning disability may suffer in the formal setting of a classroom, they tend to develop skills that carry them strongly into adult life, where success and failure are not measured by tests where every student is measured with the same measuring tape. At the holidays, I often receive cards from students and parents thanking me for my reassurance that school will be hard, but work in the “real world” will go well.

Dr. Peter Meiland Ph.D. Educational Background and Credentials

Clinical Psychologist Serving NYC

Dr. Meiland received his undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan in 1986. He received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1995 from Teachers College, Columbia University, obtaining two master’s degrees while pursuing his doctorate. The following year, 1996, he was licensed as a clinical psychologist in New York State and has been continuously licensed at the highest level in his field since that point. He maintains a private practice in Manhattan, providing to adults, and psychological testing for learning disabilities to children and adults.

From 1997 to 2001, Dr. Meiland served as a clinical supervisor at Teachers College, Columbia University, focusing mainly on testing and assessment. From 1995 to 2005, he taught as an Assistant Adjunct Professor of Psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, C.U.N.Y., and was also Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology at New York University (N.Y.U.) from 1998 to 2000.
Dr. Meiland has extensive clinical experience beginning in 1991, when he served as a psychology intern for one year, and then as a therapist and Staff Psychologist at the Postgraduate Center for Mental Health in midtown Manhattan. At the Postgraduate Center, he provided direct clinical services, supervision, and testing and assessment, working there from 1991 to 1998. He entered private practice in 1996. From 1998 to 2002, Dr. Meiland worked as a Staff Psychologist in the Learning Disabilities Unit (L.D.U.) at the S.U.N.Y. College of Optometry in New York City, where he received intensive experience in the assessment of learning disabilities, working mostly with children in the early grades, but also with adolescents and adults. He has presented papers at the meetings of the International Dyslexia Association (I.D.A.) on several occasions, most recently in 2005.

In 2002, Dr. Meiland began a certificate program in Adult Psychoanalysis at the Institute of Psychoanalytic Teaching and Research (IPTAR) in New York City, and received his certificate in 2008. He has presented a series of papers in the psychoanalytic community since receiving this training, and has served in several administrative and service roles for IPTAR since 2008, including clinical supervision of psychological testing provided by trainees in IPTAR’s educational placements.

Since 1996, Dr. Meiland has been a clinical psychologist in private practice, and specializes in several areas.

  • First, he provides intensive psychotherapy to adults and adolescents, utilizing an approach that mixes cognitive and psychoanalytic approaches to therapy.
  • He focuses on treatment of anxiety and depression, relationship issues, health problems, aging, and career challenges.
  • In addition, he has extensive experience in the treatment of diabetics, in particular Type 1 (juvenile) diabetics.
  • Finally, he provides testing and assessment of learning disabilities, for issues ranging from Reading Disorder (dyslexia), language problems and visual-spatial reasoning deficits, and Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (A.D.H.D.)

He maintains a modest range of fees, dependent on the client’s ability to pay, and is active in filing claims with the health insurance companies of his clients. He does not accept insurance directly, apart from Medicare Part B.

Over 20 Years Experience

I have been in private practice in the Union Square neighborhood since 1996, and have also worked in a number of clinical and educational settings.

Training

I earned my doctorate (Ph.D.) in Clinical Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University and trained as a psychoanalyst between 2002 and 2008 in order to deepen my skills and understanding in helping my clients.

Supportive, Genuine & Individual Approach

While my training and background is broadly psychoanalytic, I am interactive with my clients, and don’t fit the mold of the silent analyst.  I am supportive, direct in my ways of talking about problems, and have a good sense of humor.